The Schoonover Center for Communication brings all Scripps College schools under one roof to encourage collaboration.

Every business that wants to compete in the global information economy uses high-tech communication systems. Banks, oil companies, insurance firms, retail chains — none of these could operate without their communication networks.

McClure School students prepare for careers in this fast-growing industry. Jobs in the information and telecommunication systems field are projected to grow by up to 30 percent by 2020. If you want a career working with technology, but don’t want to major in engineering, this is the place for you.


Our students learn by doing, putting classroom education to the test in our hands-on labs and through internships. McClure alumni are frequent speakers and presenters, offering a real-world perspective that keeps our students up to date on industry trends. Our faculty are active researchers and consultants; all McClure faculty worked in the industry before entering academia.

Whether you seek a bachelor’s or master’s degree, the McClure School’s world-class program will give you the skills you need to succeed in this exciting industry.

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Points of Pride

1981: Ohio University launches one of the nation's first undergraduate programs in communication systems management.

1986: The Center for Communication Management is designated a school within the College of Communication.

1988: The School of Communication Management is renamed in honor of Gannett Co. executive J. Warren McClure, BS `40, in recognition of his continuing support for the program.

2006: The name changes again to the J. Warren McClure School of Information and Telecommunication Systems, reflecting changes in the industry.

2008: The MITS program is named a Program of Excellence by the International Telecommunications Education and Research Association

2010: The undergraduate degree program is named a Program of Excellence by ITERA.

2015: Information and Telecommunication Systems launches a 4 + 1 Program, enabling ITS undergraduates to earn a Master's degree with one year of additional study.

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